Historian: North Dakota not really a state

In November of 2012, the people of North Dakota will vote to become a US state. This is no joke. It turns out the 122-year-old state constitution has a flaw that no one noticed until historian John Rolczynski caught it in 1995. You can read up on all the details here, but the outcome is that—technically—North Dakota is still a territory; that is, until they vote to fix the problem next year.  Since no one has created an updated map of the 49-state America, we figured it was our duty to do so.

4 comments:

  1. If it was voted and accepted to be admitted as a state, and technically the ND Constitution doesn't contradict the US Constitution (it just leaves something out), wouldn't the US Constitution override the flaw?

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  2. Already way ahead of you, with my 49-star flag.

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  3. I agree with Crouse. Just because the ND Constitution doesn't require executive branch officials to take an oath, doesn't mean the entire document is invalid and ND never became a state.

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  4. Having been to law school, I can assure you that when the wording of a legal text is clearly not the intention of the authority empowered to make the decision that leads to the publishing a text, the wording gives way to the intention. There are thousands and thousands of pages of legislative records, administrative codes, courtroom and legislative transcripts. Errors get made, and when they are obvious, they are ignored.

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